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Archive for the ‘Future of Kashmir’ Category

Any articles related to the Kashmir’s future and what every one thinks about it.

AFGHANISTAN ASKING FOR ROAD LINK WITH CHINA THROUGH TAGHDUMBASH PAMIR

Posted by Kashmir Portal on June 16, 2009

AFGHANISTAN ASKING FOR ROAD LINK WITH CHINA THROUGH TAGHDUMBASH PAMIR (WAKHAN CORRIDOR TIP) AND GUARDING INTERESTS OF THE HUMAN BEINGS OF THE BOLOR AND KASHMIR COUNTRIES

1. Afghan foreign minister Rangin Dafdar Spanta, during his four day visit to China has requested Chinese for opening of a vehicular route through the NE tip of strategic Wakhan corridor; which is beyond doubt part and parcel of the former State of BJK (Kashmir). According to the Afghan foreign minister, the Chinese have consented to his request. Taghdumbash portion of Pamir was carved out from Hunza and Yasin territories of Gilgit and connected with Afghanistan to ward off an imminent clash between British Indian and Russian expanding empires in the unmapped country of the great game. APNA, GBDA, Kashmiri & Bolor diaspora, political activists and other politicians, intellectuals and activists are requested to display foresight and vision to guard our future generation’s interests.

2. It is very sad to realise that we are still unaware of the correct circumstances under which our strategic AKSAI CHIN portion of Laddakh of the former disputed state across Karakoram pass and close to Yarkand went away from us. We should collectively act in time. It is heard that the international relation department of a famous American university has formed a panel to carry out a research, so as to find out the circumstances and reasons for loss of Aksai Chin by the former State of Kashmir. We may not have an objection to the arrangement between then Chinese and Afghans over a route through our Pamir portion. But due consideration and share should be given to the people of Bolor and Kashmir for their vital, historical and commercial interests in the Central Asian States and beyond from it to Afghanistan, Iran, Russia and Europe.

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Posted in Cultural Heritage, File Record, Future of Kashmir | Comments Off on AFGHANISTAN ASKING FOR ROAD LINK WITH CHINA THROUGH TAGHDUMBASH PAMIR

Army retreat from J&K will be suicidal

Posted by Kashmir Portal on June 16, 2009

Army retreat from J&K will be suicidal

Ramesh Khazanchi Sunday June 14, 2009
The Times of India

Link – http://blogs. timesofindia. indiatimes. com/Hard- copy/entry/ it-s-a-war- keep

Kashmir, I admit, is my fixation, for I am a victim of its two-decade-long dalliance with death and destruction. The latest spark adding insult to injury is the reported acceptance by the Union home minister, P Chidambaram, of a proposal from the J&K state leadership seeking the suspension or revocation of the Armed Forces Special Powers Act, 1958 (AFSPA). However, even talk of its revocation could spell doom for the return of normalcy to the violence-ridden valley. Pakistan’s ruinous internecine battle within may have its ramifications across the LoC, not by chance but by design.

It was Chidambaram’s first visit to the valley after he became home minister. Let him lead by example. If he looks soft by the exterior, let it not be mistaken as a sign of weakness. Flexing the iron hand in the velvet glove, I believe, is the need of the hour. If financial wizardry is his forte, strategic planning ought to be his bible in his new role. It is far too pre-mature at this stage to even think of putting on hold the AFSPA let alone its revocation. In any case, the unified Command – which comprises the Army brass, the governor, the chief minister and the Cabinet Committee on Security – has to deliberate the issue before a decision in this regard is made.

Legend has it that Kashmir is the land of Kashyap rishi (seer), the eponymous saint who lent the ‘vahr’ (bowl-shaped) valley its name and identity, exterminated the ‘asuras’ (demons) who would devour the God-fearing aborigines. Mark, the first syllable is common to both – Kash-yap and Kash-mir. Born and brought up in the paradise-turned- cauldron, like tens of thousands of other Kashmiri Hindus – to be precise Kashmiri Pandits – I have been driven out of my motherland for no fault of mine by none other than the jihadis, brainwashed at a tender age by the scourge-on-earth – the Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI), Pakistan’s supra-constitutiona l ‘international- sabotage institution’.

Americans have realised it post 9/11 – much, much after we Indians fell victim to Pakistan’s machinations and the gory violence it unleashed in a bid to wrest control of the land which never was theirs. For 20 years we suffered at their hands in Punjab, and for the last two decades in Jammu & Kashmir in what is euphemistically termed a low-intensity conflict (LIC). What they failed to attain by outright aggression in 1947, ’65 and ’71, has been attempted by sowing the seeds of internal strife and secession.

Only the Cowboy has gone the whole hog after them as he has the wherewithal and the will to exterminate the scourge.

The grand old American democracy has introduced a plethora of all-encompassing legislation, including the Homeland Security Act and US Patriot Act, which permit the DNA profiling of people suspected of terrorist activity against the US or its interests and subjects abroad. That’s what nations are legitimately supposed to do to protect their territorial integrity and national sovereignty aimed at securing the life, liberty, business and property of its citizens and allies.

Alas, the weak-kneed Indian government has, unlike Americans, failed to stem the tide of home-grown militancy and Pakistan-sponsored insurgency in the state. India, under whichever political dispensation at the Centre, has abysmally failed to turn the adversity into opportunity on many an occasion. The high point being Pakistan’s Kargil misadventure, although a godsend for us, we missed the bus again for we failed the nation by not declaring a full-fledged war on all fronts, including the western front and the Karachi harbour. What do we maintain for the Naval behemoth in the Arabian sea? Are we content in letting it be an augmentation of the Coast Guard? There we failed, too, in the wake of the enemy’s cloak-and-dagger operation when so-called non-state actors surreptitiously sailed across the high seas to carry out the 26/11 terrorist mission in Mumbai under explicit directions and logistic support by their agent-provocateur across the Radcliffe Line.

On November 27, 1997, then Chief Justice of India J S Verma and four other judges of the Supreme Court on a review petition of the AFSPA (in the context of the north-east) observed, “The power to make a law providing for deployment of the armed forces of the Union in aid of the civil power of a State does not include within its ambit the power to enact a law which would enable the armed forces of the Union to supplant or act as a substitute for the civil power in the State. The armed forces of the Union would operate in the State concerned in cooperation with the civil administration so that the situation which has necessitated the deployment of armed forces is effectively dealt with and normalcy is restored.”

It is explicit in the judgment that the Army will act “in aid of the civil administration of the state”… until “normalcy is restored.” Keeping in view the recent successful bids by the battle-hardened militants to infiltrate into the valley under heavy arms fire-cover provided by the Pakistan army coupled with the melting snow at the high mountain passes, the situation does not warrant any lowering of guard by the armed forces which alone are trained and equipped to fight the Talibanized insurgents. However, Rashtriya Rifles, which has borne the brunt of militant attacks and in turn broken the backbone of the insurgency in J&K, does act hand in hand with the state police and the paramilitary forces. In any case, it is the local police and the paramilitary forces which maintain security in Srinagar and its outskirts. The Army, to all intents and purposes, has since been ordered to the barracks. But any inference that the situation is fast returning to normal and warrants the revocation of the AFSPA would indeed be a retrograde step fraught with dire consequences.

The grand old American democracy has introduced a plethora of all-encompassing legislation, including the Homeland Security Act and US Patriot Act, which permit the DNA profiling of people suspected of terrorist activity against the US or its interests and subjects abroad. That’s what nations are legitimately supposed to do to protect their territorial integrity and national sovereignty aimed at securing the life, liberty, business and property of its citizens and allies.

Kashmir, I admit, is my fixation, for I am a victim of its two-decade-long dalliance with death and destruction. The latest spark adding insult to injury is the reported acceptance by the Union home minister, P Chidambaram, of a proposal from the J&K state leadership seeking the suspension or revocation of the Armed Forces Special Powers Act, 1958 (AFSPA). However, even talk of its revocation could spell doom for the return of normalcy to the violence-ridden valley. Pakistan’s ruinous internecine battle within may have its ramifications across the LoC, not by chance but by design.

It was Chidambaram’s first visit to the valley after he became home minister. Let him lead by example. If he looks soft by the exterior, let it not be mistaken as a sign of weakness. Flexing the iron hand in the velvet glove, I believe, is the need of the hour. If financial wizardry is his forte, strategic planning ought to be his bible in his new role. It is far too pre-mature at this stage to even think of putting on hold the AFSPA let alone its revocation. In any case, the unified Command – which comprises the Army brass, the governor, the chief minister and the Cabinet Committee on Security – has to deliberate the issue before a decision in this regard is made.

Legend has it that Kashmir is the land of Kashyap rishi (seer), the eponymous saint who lent the ‘va
hr’ (bowl-shaped) valley its name and identity, exterminated the ‘asuras’ (demons) who would devour the God-fearing aborigines. Mark, the first syllable is common to both – Kash-yap and Kash-mir. Born and brought up in the paradise-turned- cauldron, like tens of thousands of other Kashmiri Hindus – to be precise Kashmiri Pandits – I have been driven out of my motherland for no fault of mine by none other than the jihadis, brainwashed at a tender age by the scourge-on-earth – the Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI), Pakistan’s supra-constitutiona l ‘international- sabotage institution’.

Americans have realised it post 9/11 – much, much after we Indians fell victim to Pakistan’s machinations and the gory violence it unleashed in a bid to wrest control of the land which never was theirs. For 20 years we suffered at their hands in Punjab, and for the last two decades in Jammu & Kashmir in what is euphemistically termed a low-intensity conflict (LIC). What they failed to attain by outright aggression in 1947, ’65 and ’71, has been attempted by sowing the seeds of internal strife and secession.

Only the Cowboy has gone the whole hog after them as he has the wherewithal and the will to exterminate the scourge.

Alas, the weak-kneed Indian government has, unlike Americans, failed to stem the tide of home-grown militancy and Pakistan-sponsored insurgency in the state. India, under whichever political dispensation at the Centre, has abysmally failed to turn the adversity into opportunity on many an occasion. The high point being Pakistan’s Kargil misadventure, although a godsend for us, we missed the bus again for we failed the nation by not declaring a full-fledged war on all fronts, including the western front and the Karachi harbour. What do we maintain for the Naval behemoth in the Arabian sea? Are we content in letting it be an augmentation of the Coast Guard? There we failed, too, in the wake of the enemy’s cloak-and-dagger operation when so-called non-state actors surreptitiously sailed across the high seas to carry out the 26/11 terrorist mission in Mumbai under explicit directions and logistic support by their agent-provocateur across the Radcliffe Line.

On November 27, 1997, then Chief Justice of India J S Verma and four other judges of the Supreme Court on a review petition of the AFSPA (in the context of the north-east) observed, “The power to make a law providing for deployment of the armed forces of the Union in aid of the civil power of a State does not include within its ambit the power to enact a law which would enable the armed forces of the Union to supplant or act as a substitute for the civil power in the State. The armed forces of the Union would operate in the State concerned in cooperation with the civil administration so that the situation which has necessitated the deployment of armed forces is effectively dealt with and normalcy is restored.”

It is explicit in the judgment that the Army will act “in aid of the civil administration of the state”… until “normalcy is restored.” Keeping in view the recent successful bids by the battle-hardened militants to infiltrate into the valley under heavy arms fire-cover provided by the Pakistan army coupled with the melting snow at the high mountain passes, the situation does not warrant any lowering of guard by the armed forces which alone are trained and equipped to fight the Talibanized insurgents. However, Rashtriya Rifles, which has borne the brunt of militant attacks and in turn broken the backbone of the insurgency in J&K, does act hand in hand with the state police and the paramilitary forces. In any case, it is the local police and the paramilitary forces which maintain security in Srinagar and its outskirts. The Army, to all intents and purposes, has since been ordered to the barracks. But any inference that the situation is fast returning to normal and warrants the revocation of the AFSPA would indeed be a retrograde step fraught with dire consequences.

Posted in Articles & Editorials, Conflict of Kashmir, Future of Kashmir, Jammu and Kashmir (I.O.K.) | Comments Off on Army retreat from J&K will be suicidal

Will Kashmir be safer, happier without Army?

Posted by Kashmir Portal on June 16, 2009

SRINAGAR: Kashmir’s young will not remember it but once upon a time, the Valley was green and peaceful and not so fragile that anything – a stone, a
bullet or a barb – could make it boil with rage.

Beating The Retreat: Hype, hope and horror | ‘Men in uniform are Kashmir’s problem, not solution’ | It’s a war, keep the Army | The Evolution Of The ‘Azadi’ Manifesto

The Valley became one of fear and fury only in the late-80s. The militancy started after rumours that the elections of 1987 were rigged. That was when the Indian forces – army and paramilitary – arrived in large numbers. Could that phase of militarization be ending, now that Home Minister P Chidambaram spoke on Thursday about the possibility of reducing the number of Indian army and CRPF troops in the state? Will young Kashmir, the generation born in 1989, ever see a Valley that is not angry and on edge?

It is a generation that sees violence, even in its dreams. Afsana Bashir, 20, speaks for many: “My own childhood in Kashmir was turbulent with a lot of memories of deaths and screams in the background.I grew up hearing gunshots. I can still recall the killing of two brothers in my locality at the Court Road in Srinagar. It was 5 in the evening, when two bodies draped in white shrouds were taken down from an ambulance. All hell broke loose as the entire neighbourhood began wailing and crying.” Afsana was just three at the time but says “those traumatic memories are still fresh in my mind”. It turns out she is describing the deaths of two young men who ran a bicycle repair shop. They died when the CRPF fired on pedestrians near Magharmal Bagh.

Strikingly, Kashmir’s young seem to have almost no happy memories. Tabinda Hilal describes the small pleasures of a life she knows only at second-hand: “I have heard from my mother about taking long strolls along the scenic boulevards in her early life; eating ice cream in the evenings…I have heard from my elders that there used to cinema halls in Srinagar. It’s difficult to believe.”

Tabinda’s incredulity is understandable. The Valley currently has just one functioning cinema hall. In 1990, JKLF militants shut down about a dozen theatres in a bid to “cleanse society of the waywardness” .

No movies. No music. No games. That is the life Afsana, Tabinda and anyone young has ever known in Kashmir.

Fayaz Ahmad Wani, 20, recounts that even “the playground where I used to play cricket has been added to a nearby graveyard”. Life in the Valley of his childhood was “pretty horrible. It was even unsafe to walk on the roads. As firing broke out very often, the pedestrians had to take shelter inside the shops or any other safe place.”

Kashmir’s young have a kinship of memories. Like Fayaz, Sharifa Jan of Nowhatta in Srinagar remembers bloody gun-battles in every town square. “The alleyways were filled with young boys wielding guns, and the Indian army was ready for combat. Soldiers huddled in bunkers that were pushed shoulder-to- shoulder against unlucky houses at the end of the lanes,” says the 20-year-old girl.

But the trauma of the young is not limited to the Valley. Irshad Nabi, 20, belongs to Baramulla. He still trembles with fear when he remembers how militants harassed his family one night and Army interrogators badgered them next day. Irshad says his life has been impossible ever since. “I was denied a passport by the authorities because of my cousin’s affiliation with some militant outfit”.

The young are united in another way. All of them want the Indian troops to go ‘home’. They believe the army’s presence in civilian areas has created an army-civilian conflict rather than staving off the militancy.

Samina Bashir of Nishat in Srinagar says the men in uniform are prone to harassing Kashmiri girls. “The local police too are involved in crime against women. The laws empowering the security forces to conduct house-to-house searches need to be reviewed.”

Posted in Articles & Editorials, Future of Kashmir | Comments Off on Will Kashmir be safer, happier without Army?

India wants Kashmir troops move

Posted by Kashmir Portal on June 14, 2009

Indian soldiers in Kashmir

Hundreds of thousands of troops are based in Kashmir

The Indian government wants to withdraw troops from the inhabited areas of Indian-administered Kashmir, the home minister has said.

Palaniappan Chidambaram told reporters that the government wants to make the local police responsible for internal security in the region.

The minister refused to give a date for the withdrawal of the soldiers.

Hundreds of thousands of soldiers are based in Kashmir, where many residents resent their presence.

Kashmir has been a flashpoint between India and Pakistan for more than 50 years and the scene of two of their three wars. A Muslim separatist insurgency has been waged since 1989.

India sent it troops into Kashmir’s towns and villages 20 years ago to deal with a worsening insurgency, but their presence is deeply unpopular, says the BBC’s Mark Dummett in Delhi.

“It is our intention to redraw the lines of responsibilities,” Mr Chidambaram said.

He said the army was responsible for guarding the borders and stopping infiltration.

“The army also comes to the aid of the state in countering terrorism. But we would like the army to do it in areas far away from towns and cities,” Mr Chidambaram.

Unrest

Separatist groups in Kashmir have long demanded the withdrawal of Indian troops and laws like the Armed Forces Special Powers Act, which gives sweeping powers to the army in the state.

Mr Chidambaram said the government would consider the demand for withdrawing the act.

“We have flagged the issue. I promise to look at it,” he said.

Mr Chidambaram’s comments came during a two-day visit to the state, which has seen some considerable unrest in recent weeks.

Police in Kashmir

Mr Chidambaram said the local police would look after internal security

The Muslim-dominated valley region has been rocked by clashes between protestors and security forces after the discovery of the bodies of two young women in late May.

Police say they are treating the deaths as rape and murder.

Local residents have accused the security forces of the killings.

Mr Chidambaram said the state government intended to hold a thorough inquiry into the incident and punish those found responsible.

For much of the last two decades, separatist militancy and cross-border firing between the Indian and Pakistani armies has left a death toll running into tens of thousands and a population traumatised by fighting and fear.

But there has overall been a significant decline in violence in Indian-administered Kashmir over the past three years.

Posted in Conflict of Kashmir, Current News, Future of Kashmir, Jammu and Kashmir (I.O.K.) | Comments Off on India wants Kashmir troops move

Kashmir: Pakistan, Pandits and Prospects for the Future

Posted by Kashmir Portal on June 14, 2009

By Ishani Chowdhury
Director of Public Policy, Hindu American Foundation
Capitol Hill Kashmir Briefing Sponsored by International Kashmir Forum and Hindu American Foundation

Tues., June 9th, 2009:
Ancient stories and modern science agree that the Kashmir Valley, lying 5,000 feet above sea level in the shadow of the Himalayas, was once a vast lake. According to ancient Sanskrit texts,
it was drained by the sage Kashyap Muni and came to be known as Kashyap Marg or the “Abode of Kashyap,” whence the name Kashmir is derived. Kashmir was the seat of Shaivite Hinduism and
Mahanaya Buddhism, but was eventually brought under Mugal rule in the 14th century, and later under Maharaja Ranjit Singh in 1819. Fast forward to 1947, the year of India’s partition. The ruler of then Kashmir, Hindu king, Maharaja Hari Singh, was given the choice to join India or Pakistan, failed to make a decision on the matter. Shortly after independence, on October 21, Pakistani backed tribals invaded Kashmir, prompting Maharaja Hari Singh to join India through the Instrument of Accession on October 26. The accession was also approved by the largest and most popular Kashmiri political party, the All Jammu and Kashmir National Conference. The Indian army was succeeding at pushing out the Pakistani invaders when a UN-backed ceasefire took hold, with the state divided along the “Line of Control” between the two armies.

The old princely state is now comprised of five regions: Kashmir, Jammu, Ladakh, the socalled Azad Jammu and Kashmir (AJK) or Pakistan occupied Kashmir (PoK), and the Northern Areas. The overall population in the Indian state of Jammu and Kashmir was estimated in 1981 at 7.7 million with Muslims (64.3%), Hindus (32.1%), Sikhs (2.16%), Buddhist (1.17%) and others, including Christians (0.26%).i Pakistan controls approximately one third the state. Constant hostility and occasional outbreaks of war have continued ever since. Today, approximately three million people live in Pakistan- occupied Kashmir and nine million in the India-administered area. The situation has only adjusted slightly since that time, most notably with China’s occupation of portions of region.
Since 1988, Islamic militancy has gripped Kashmir causing an expulsion of approximately 300,000 Hindus from the Valley into refugee camps. Militant groups, such as the Jaish-e- Mohammed (JeM), Army of Mohammed, Laskhar-e-Tayyiba (LT), Army of the Righteous and Harakat-ul-Jihad-ul-Islami (HuJi) espouse violence against Kashmiri Hindus and have been banned by the United States and United Kingdom. Militancy has led to more than 42,000 deaths in the state since 1988, with 530 fatalities in 2008 alone.

As detailed in the Hindu American Foundation’s annual Hindu Human Rights Report, Islamic militants in Kashmir were recruited, trained, funded and given refuge by Pakistan’s military and powerful Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI) agency. According to former scholar, and the current Pakistani ambassador to the U.S., Husain Haqqani, the violence in Kashmir was, “rooted in the ideology of Pakistani Islamists, carefully nurtured for decades by the Pakistani military.”ii In fact, the founder and former head of the outlawed Lashkar-e-Taiba affirmed that “killing Hindus” was the best solution to resolve the six-decades-old dispute between Pakistan and India over Kashmir.iii These terrorists also have ties with the Taliban and Al-Qaeda operating in the Pakistan-Afghanistan border areas, which continues to be the center of terror networks, fundamentalism, drug trafficking, illicit trade in small arms and international terrorism.

Today, the selective slaughter of Hindus in Kashmir continues with kidnappings, grenade attacks at wedding parties, temple destruction, the targeting of Village Defense Committees, death
threats, and systematic torture. For example, the dreaded “butcher of Pandits,” Bitta Karatay of the Jammu and Kashmir Liberation Front (JKLF) was released from prison on bail in October 2006. He
was arrested in 1990 for the killing of more than thirty Pandits and creating such fear in the small Hindu minority community that it was one of the major triggers for the mass fleeing of Pandits
from the Kashmir Valley.iv Even recently, not much has changed in terms of human rights for the Pandit population. In August 2008, Islamic militants took eleven members of a Hindu family
hostage, including women and children, resulting in an 18-hour standoff with Indian army personnel. Five Hindus were killed and three were injured during the incident.

Religious sites and pilgrimages have not been spared. Since 1989, over 200 Hindu temples have damaged or destroyed in Kashmir, and over 100 religious sites illegally occupied. The annual
Hindu pilgrimage to the holy cave in Amarnath is heavily guarded by the Indian military due to the long history of violent attack by Islamist militants. While the Indian government has made
overtures to return the displaced Kashmiri Pandit population into their rightful homes, concrete plans to shift them from the dilapidated housing, poor water and sanitation services at the refugee
camps, have yet to be implemented.

With two nuclear armed nations whose large fraction of the troops patrol the Line of Control, the current tenuous state in Pakistan makes Kashmir even more relevant. Pakistan’s history and current situation of its miniscule 3% minority community, which at 1947 was 25% Hindu, is a testament of deteriorating human rights and law and order in that nation. Minorities live in constant fear with threats to their lives and property, destruction of places of worship and judicial onslaughts through the Blasphemy Act and religious identification on passports. Even as recently as April, Sikhs and Hindus fled the Swat Valley in Pakistan after sustained threats from the Taliban and the imposition of jaziya (penalty tax) on minorities in area.v In Pakistan portion of Kashmir, the government has failed to provide basic rights and democratic representation to the Kashmiri people. The area is no longer entirely Kashmiri as the government has settled non-Kashmiris into the region and the remaining local Kashmiris are discriminated against, while Pakistanis are given preferential treatment.vi The operation of militant training camps in the Pakistan occupied area of Kashmir, as well as the ideological and tactical support by the ISI further fuels the tension in the region.

Effective and timely resolution of the fate of the state, as well as that of the Kashmiri Pandit population, can not occur until and unless there is a complete end to the Islamist militancy and the dogma that guides them. This radical ideology has resulted in what Pakistan is facing now on a daily basis – a rise in attacks by the Taliban against government personnel, hotels, shopping centers, the shutting of schools, and the strict imposition of Shariah law in the areas where it has gained control. While the Pakistani government has started a counterinsurgency campaign in many of these areas, there are still regions that it does not entirely control, and separate internal campaigns by Baluchis who have been fighting for independence from the country. The failure of Pakistan to counteract the Islamist ideology may likely further destabilize the region, including inadvertently dragging in China which is facing its own issues with Uighur Muslims.

It is incumbent upon India to create an atmosphere that allows from the safe return and resettlement of the Valley’s Hindu population. The state government must be able to provide full
protection and accommodation to Hindu pilgrims and pilgrimage sites. It is equally important that Article 370 of the Constitution be revoked, as it has allowed for the State’s residents to be
governed under a separate set of laws, thus preventing full integration into the Indian Union, and further segregating the Hindu population who have been forced to migrate out of the region.
The solution to Kashmir, and the region, lies in the end of Islamist ideology and propaganda, fueled and funded by state governments. The continuation of this conflict drains time,
money and resources that can be better used in fighting the ongoing battles in the country against the Taliban. If these factors are not controlled, then it will not be too long until there is a fullfledged conflict that may erupt into a greater international crisis.

  1. Paul Beersmans, “Jammu and Kashmir: A Smouldering Conflict and a Forgotten Mission of the United Nations,” Belgian Association for Solidarity with Jammu and Kashmir, January 2002, http://www.basjak.org/doc/jkNutshell.pdf
  2. Husain Haqqani, “Pakistan: Between Mosque and Military”, p. 235. 2005, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace
  3. “Killing Hindus better than talks: Hafiz Saeed,” Daily Times, April 4, 2003. http://www.dailytimes.com.pk/default.asp?page=story_4-4-2003_pg8_4
  4. Ishfaq-Ul-Hassan. “’Butcher’ of Pandits back in Kashmir hometown.” Daily News & Analysis. October 27, 2006. http://www.dnaindia.com/report.asp?NewsID=1060576
  5. 200 Sikhs Flee from Swat, Rediff, April 15, 2009, http://news.rediff.com/report/2009/apr/15/sikhs-flee-from-swat.htm
  6. Beersman, Paul, “The Kashmir-Issue: European Perspectives.” Belgian Association for Solidarity with Jammu and Kashmir. http://www.basjak.org/doc/jkind081warikoo.pdf

Posted in Articles & Editorials, Conflict of Kashmir, Future of Kashmir, Jammu and Kashmir (I.O.K.) | Comments Off on Kashmir: Pakistan, Pandits and Prospects for the Future